Tag: ‘Center on Budget and Policy Priorities’

Most State Budgets Are Improving But Their Long-Term Prospects Remain Uncertain

By :: September 17th, 2015

If you are not an energy dependent state, things ought to be pretty good, at least in the short-term. The economy is improving, though slowly, The Rockefeller Institute reported this morning that state tax revenues grew by 5.8 percent in the first quarter of this year and by 7.6 percent in the second quarter. But […]

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Dynamic Scoring Forum: Now We Really Need More Information

By :: February 25th, 2015

This is one of a series of guest TaxVox blog posts discussing dynamic scoring House Ways & Means Committee Chairman Paul Ryan has claimed that the House dynamic scoring rule would generate more information.  But the new rule asks for an official cost estimate that reflects only a single estimate of a bill’s supposed impact […]

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Better Ways to Link the Affordable Care Act with Tax Filing Season

By :: February 23rd, 2015

The Obama Administration, finally acknowledging the seasonal mismatch between the Affordable Care Act’s open enrollment season and the ACA’s tax-based penalties for failing to have insurance, decided on Friday to create a new special enrollment season for this year only.  The new window will allow those who are subject to the penalty for 2014 ($95 […]

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Don’t Count on Much Economic Growth From Individual Tax Reform…Or From Tax Rate Cuts

By :: September 10th, 2014

Can individual income tax reform that cuts rates and eliminates subsidies increase economic growth? How about tax cuts by themselves? The answer is: Maybe, but not by much, according to a new paper by the Tax Policy Center’s Bill Gale and Andrew Samwick, director of The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy and Social […]

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As Budget Talks Start, Beware the Bogus Revenue Hikes

By :: October 31st, 2013

As House and Senate budget negotiators sit down (eight months late), the inevitable issue of new revenues has already raised its head. Predictably, Democrats insist that any fiscal deal include new taxes. Equally predictably, Republicans demand that it must not. But behind the scenes, Washington’s wink-and-nod crowd thinks it has a solution: Raise new tax […]

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Do Low-Income Taxpayers Cheat?

By :: July 18th, 2013

My blog last Tuesday on overblown concerns about people falsely claiming subsides under the Affordable Care Act’s insurance exchanges generated a lot of response. Much focused on my assertion that the income tax system operates remarkably well as a largely voluntary program. Their retort: I naively misjudged the willingness of low-income people to cheat. In […]

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An Opportunity to Really Fix Social Security

By :: April 9th, 2013

The White House has put out the word that President Obama’s budget will propose changing the way government adjusts benefits for Social Security and other programs (as well as the income tax). Liberal Social Security advocates are furious. By shifting to a measure called the chained Consumer Price Index, the retirement system would boost benefits […]

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Will Going Over the Fiscal Cliff Make a Budget Deal Possible?

By :: October 2nd, 2012

This afternoon, I moderated an Urban Institute panel on taxes and the fiscal cliff. The fundamental question on the table:  Will Congress have to tumble over the precipice in order to build the political consensus it needs to do a budget deal? To put it another way, will it take the fear of a financial market […]

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