Tag: ‘budget’

The Debt Limit: Here We Go Again

By :: October 15th, 2015

In less than a month—and in perhaps as little as 18 days– the federal government will be unable to pay its bills. Realistically, there is only one way to avoid such a fiscal mess: Congress must raise the federal debt limit so Treasury can borrow more money. But how will that happen? On one hand, […]

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Estimates and the Economy: Let the Buyer Beware

By :: June 24th, 2015

The CBO, the ACA, and the economy: Precision doesn’t mean accuracy. Last Friday, the Congressional Budget Office projected that repeal of the Affordable Care Act would add $137 billion to the national debt over 10 years but boost the economy. But the estimates came with a big warning: “[R]epealing the ACA could in fact reduce […]

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Dynamic Scoring Forum: Inside the Black Box

By :: March 17th, 2015

This is one of a series of TaxVox guest blogs discussing dynamic scoring. Whether dynamic scoring for official revenue estimates is a good or bad idea, it is now a part of scoring rules in the House. As a result, it is more compelling than ever to understand the forces that determine economic effects. Previous […]

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On Budgeting, Patience, and Rube Goldberg

By :: March 17th, 2015

Out today: A first look at GOP budgets. The US hit its debt limit yesterday (at least technically), and the budget battles have begun. The Senate GOP budget resolution  reportedly won’t include detailed plans to overhaul entitlement programs—though the House GOP plan may. The Senate Budget panel version will propose only savings targets for Medicare […]

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Raising Taxes to Fuel, Fly, and… Drink?

By :: March 13th, 2015

Have taxes, will travel. The American Road & Transportation Builders Association wants Congress to raise the federal gas tax by 15 cents a gallon to generate $401 billion in new transportation funding. Money for the Highway Trust Fund dries up in May. The group suggests the tax be offset with a federal tax rebate for middle […]

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Dynamic Scoring Forum: Overblown Concerns?

By :: March 12th, 2015

This is one of a series of TaxVox guest blogs discussing dynamic scoring. Macroeconomic scoring, aka dynamic scoring, has been debated for years. For the 114th Congress, the House has adopted a rule to institute the procedure for major bills. But what would dynamic scoring really mean in practice? Why would changing to dynamic scoring […]

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Dynamic Scoring Forum: The Dangers of Dynamic Scoring

By :: March 6th, 2015

This is one of a series of TaxVox guest blogs discussing dynamic scoring. One of the strengths of the US budgeting system is that proposals are held accountable through a relatively open process of scoring the costs and benefits.  This process, as run by the Congressional Budget Office and others, looks carefully at the impact […]

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Dynamic Scoring Forum: Three Things You Should Know About Dynamic Scoring

By :: February 27th, 2015

This is one of a series of guest TaxVox blog posts discussing dynamic scoring. The House recently changed the rules of budget scoring: The Congressional Budget Office and the Joint Committee on Taxation will now account for macroeconomic effects when estimating the budget impacts of major legislation. Here are three things you should know as […]

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Dynamic Scoring Forum: Now We Really Need More Information

By :: February 25th, 2015

This is one of a series of guest TaxVox blog posts discussing dynamic scoring House Ways & Means Committee Chairman Paul Ryan has claimed that the House dynamic scoring rule would generate more information.  But the new rule asks for an official cost estimate that reflects only a single estimate of a bill’s supposed impact […]

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The President’s Capital Gains Proposals: An Opening for Business Tax Reform?

By :: February 6th, 2015

In his budget proposal, President Obama would raise capital gains taxes as a way to finance middle class tax relief. Along with many Republicans, he also supports tax rate cuts for business and efforts to prevent multinational corporations from avoiding U. S. taxation. This raises an intriguing possibility. Why not pay for at least some […]

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