Topic: About TaxVox

Ferguson City Finances: Not the New Normal

By :: April 8th, 2015

The recently completed US Department of Justice (DOJ) investigation into Ferguson’s police department highlighted “the City’s focus on revenue rather than … public safety needs” when setting law enforcement priorities. It noted that fines and forfeitures nearly doubled as a share of the city’s general fund revenues from fiscal years 2010 to 2015 (from 12 […]

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One Solution to California’s Drought: Tax Water

By :: April 7th, 2015

The idea is straight out of Economics 101: If you want people to do less of something, raise the price. And California desperately needs its residents and businesses to use less water. So rather than trying to curb water use through a complex maze of regulation, why not just raise the price though a new […]

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“Family Fairness Tax Reform” is Hard on Poor Families

By :: March 19th, 2015

Senators Mike Lee (R-UT) and Marco Rubio (R-FL) made a big splash with their “Economic Growth and Family Fairness Tax Plan” last month, which among other things would create a new partially refundable $2,500 per child tax credit (CTC).  The plan is ambitious and expensive, but it may hurt many low-income families with children, according […]

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Who’s Afraid of Income Taxes? New Interactive TPC Tools To Help You Understand the 1040

By :: March 18th, 2015

Need help understanding the 1040 as we enter the homestretch of this year’s tax filing season? The Tax Policy Center has created a new interactive tool to walk you through key parts of the federal income tax, ranging from the mundane to the arcane. In bite-sized pieces, Who’s Afraid of the Form 1040? discusses the main […]

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Dynamic Scoring Forum: Inside the Black Box

By :: March 17th, 2015

This is one of a series of TaxVox guest blogs discussing dynamic scoring. Whether dynamic scoring for official revenue estimates is a good or bad idea, it is now a part of scoring rules in the House. As a result, it is more compelling than ever to understand the forces that determine economic effects. Previous […]

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What if We Funded Public Education Like Affordable Care Act Health Insurance?

By :: February 27th, 2015

The Tax Policy Center’s recent panel discussion on the Affordable Care Act’s tax-based system of subsidies and penalties highlighted the convoluted way the ACA promotes health insurance. As a thought experiment, imagine if we funded public education the same way we pay for the ACA’s exchange-based insurance. Their goals are similar. Both seek to promote […]

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Dynamic Scoring Forum: Now We Really Need More Information

By :: February 25th, 2015

This is one of a series of guest TaxVox blog posts discussing dynamic scoring House Ways & Means Committee Chairman Paul Ryan has claimed that the House dynamic scoring rule would generate more information.  But the new rule asks for an official cost estimate that reflects only a single estimate of a bill’s supposed impact […]

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Go Team: Score 1 for Obama on Ending Tax Subsidies for College Sports

By :: February 6th, 2015

I love college sports. I really do – especially basketball. (Go Wildcats!) But I also love President Obama’s FY16 budget proposal to cut federal subsidies for premium seats at college sporting events. Federal subsidies ought to provide national benefits and there’s no evidence that boosting attendance in high-priced courtside or skybox seats does that. Let’s […]

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A Fuller Accounting of How State and Local Governments Fared in the Great Recession

By :: February 4th, 2015

For state and local finance geeks, nothing is more fun than poring over the Census Bureau’s Census of Governments. The agency only updates the data every five years, so imagine my excitement when it released its latest version (for 2012) just a few months ago. Although Census and other agencies release some state and local […]

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A Look at the Territorial Tax Systems in Four Countries Finds No Magic Bullets

By :: January 22nd, 2015

It is an article of faith among many tax reformers that the U.S. should shift from a worldwide tax system to a territorial regime in which U.S.-based multinational corporations pay U.S. tax only on their domestic income.  Such a step would reduce or eliminate tax on the dividends these firms receive from their foreign affiliates. […]

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