Howard Gleckman

BIO
Howard Gleckman is a Resident Fellow at the Urban Institute and editor of TaxVox. He is author of “Caring for Our Parents,” (St. Martin’s Press), a book on how we deliver and finance long-term care to seniors and adults with disabilities. He was formerly senior correspondent in the Washington bureau of Business Week, a Media Fellow at the Kaiser Family Foundation, and a Visiting Fellow at the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College. Twitter: @howard_gleckman


The Rubio-Lee Tax Reform Plan Raises Important Issues But Would Add Trillions to the Debt

By :: March 4th, 2015

The newest entrants in the tax reform sweepstakes are senators Marco Rubio (R-FL) and Mike Lee (R-UT).  Their plan is filled with a number of interesting and credible ideas but ducks many important questions. And, while it is not accompanied by a budget score, the elements that it specifies would add trillions of dollars to […]

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States Want To Cut Taxes Even More on Pensions. Bad Ideas Never Die.

By :: March 4th, 2015

The siren song of retirement income free of state taxes continues to seduce politicians. No matter that there is little evidence that high taxes on pension income drive away seniors, or that few older people move from one state to another for any reason at all. No matter that tax-free retirement income benefits the rich […]

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So Far, Affordable Care Act Users Are Managing Tax Filing, Many Uninsured May Use New Enrollment Period

By :: February 24th, 2015

So far, most people with Affordable Care Act insurance subsidies seem to be filing their taxes without huge problems, despite the complexity of the process. However, about half of those who have filed returns with tax prep firm H&R Block and who owe a penalty for not having insurance, have expressed interest in purchasing exchange coverage, […]

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Better Ways to Link the Affordable Care Act with Tax Filing Season

By :: February 23rd, 2015

The Obama Administration, finally acknowledging the seasonal mismatch between the Affordable Care Act’s open enrollment season and the ACA’s tax-based penalties for failing to have insurance, decided on Friday to create a new special enrollment season for this year only.  The new window will allow those who are subject to the penalty for 2014 ($95 […]

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Tax Vox Will Host an Online Policy Forum on Dynamic Scoring

By :: February 19th, 2015

The House vote to require the Congressional Budget Office and the congressional Joint Committee on Taxation to include macroeconomic effects in some official budget scores is enormously controversial in the policy world and among economists. To help unpack this complex issue, Tax Vox has asked several budget and tax experts to present their views on this process, known as dynamic […]

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Lawmakers Talk Tax Reform But Keep Pushing New Tax Subsidies

By :: February 12th, 2015

It is hard not to notice that while policymakers are talking tax reform they are walking tax deform. The more they vow to lower tax rates and eliminate targeted tax preferences (close loopholes in Congress-speak), the more bills they push to create new subsidies or juice up old ones. Yesterday, the Senate Finance Committee created three new tax […]

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Tax Subsidies May Not Help Start-Ups as Much as Lawmakers Think

By :: February 9th, 2015

Many tax subsidies help new businesses, especially those financed with borrowed money and organized to avoid the corporate income tax . However, large numbers of start-ups may not benefit from this largess, according to a new study by my Tax Policy Center colleagues Joe Rosenberg and Donald Marron. Startups   and those that lose money in […]

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How Will Jeb Bush Turn His Vision of Government into Tax Policy?

By :: February 5th, 2015

Jeb Bush gave a fascinating and important speech yesterday to the Detroit Economic Club, a traditional venue for presidential candidates. In it, he laid out an economic and social vision that echoed in many ways the “compassionate conservatism” message that his brother used with great success in his first run for the White House. But the […]

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Do Obama’s Corporate Tax Proposals Add Up?

By :: February 4th, 2015

The tax proposals in President Obama’s 2016 budget combine two interesting ideas for international reform with his often-stated–but still vague– goal of a broad-based corporate tax overhaul. First, the framework: Obama has once again proposed cutting the corporate tax rate to 28 percent from the current 35 percent, with a special 25 percent rate for […]

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Obama's Failure to Kill 529 Plans May Say Less About Tax Reform Than You Think

By :: January 30th, 2015

After President Obama proposed, and rapidly abandoned, a plan to curb the tax advantages of Sec. 529 college savings accounts, several wise observers, including my friend David Wessel at Brookings, saw an object lesson for broad-based tax reform. To wit: If lawmakers can’t ditch a single $1 billion tax break, how could they possibly agree to […]

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