Howard Gleckman

BIO
Howard Gleckman is a Resident Fellow at the Urban Institute and editor of TaxVox. He is author of “Caring for Our Parents,” (St. Martin’s Press), a book on how we deliver and finance long-term care to seniors and adults with disabilities. He was formerly senior correspondent in the Washington bureau of Business Week, a Media Fellow at the Kaiser Family Foundation, and a Visiting Fellow at the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College. Twitter: @howard_gleckman


Is Dynamic Scoring of Tax Bills Ready For Prime Time?

By :: January 26th, 2015

The House has instructed the Joint Committee on Taxation and the Congressional Budget Office to factor in the macroeconomic effects of tax law changes when calculating the official budget score of revenue bills. But are existing models up to the task of what’s commonly called dynamic scoring? A group of experts assembled today by the […]

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A Look at the Territorial Tax Systems in Four Countries Finds No Magic Bullets

By :: January 22nd, 2015

It is an article of faith among many tax reformers that the U.S. should shift from a worldwide tax system to a territorial regime in which U.S.-based multinational corporations pay U.S. tax only on their domestic income.  Such a step would reduce or eliminate tax on the dividends these firms receive from their foreign affiliates. […]

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The Tax Reform Gap Between Obama and the GOP is Widening

By :: January 20th, 2015

In his state of the union address, President Obama laid out his vision for the tax code. Earlier in the day, in a speech to the Chamber of Commerce, Senate Finance Committee chair Orrin Hatch (R-UT) described his. They are not only on different planets. They inhabit different galaxies. Obama wants to raise capital gains […]

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The IRS Should Fix Its Letter Audit Program

By :: January 20th, 2015

The beleaguered IRS has two enormous challenges: It must rebuild its reputation to win congressional support for the funding it needs to do its job. And, because it will never get all the money it needs, it must spend the dollars it does have more wisely. It can start by improving the way it communicates with […]

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What To Make of the Senate Finance Committee’s Tax Reform Workgroups

By :: January 15th, 2015

The Senate Finance Committee has created five bipartisan working groups to develop ideas for comprehensive tax reform by the end of May.  It is a good idea. But it is unlikely to accelerate the panel’s timetable for producing legislation. The task forces won’t develop many new ideas. Let’s be honest: For the most part, when it […]

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Gale and DeLong Debate: Is the Budget Deficit Even a Problem?

By :: January 13th, 2015

Do deficits, or at least currently projected deficits, matter? It is an age-old question that’s going to get renewed attention in a Congress where Republicans have made no secret of their desire to cut government spending. Of course, cutting spending is not the same thing as reducing the deficit. And many in the GOP are far more […]

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Rep. Goodlatte Would Abolish the Tax Code…and Require a Balanced Budget

By :: January 8th, 2015

Sometimes, the strangeness on Capitol Hill takes your breath away. Representative Bob Goodlatte (R-VA) introduced three bills as soon as the new Congress was sworn in this week. The first would abolish the entire tax code and replace it with…something else. The other two would amend the Constitution to require a balanced budget. One specifically […]

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Nine Tax Stories to Watch in 2015

By :: January 6th, 2015

So much has changed. Yet, when it comes to taxes, so much has not. Republicans have taken control of Congress and now hold governorships in 31 states. The U.S. economy is finally on solid ground. And presidential hopefuls are gearing up for the 2016 election. But for all that, the top tax stories of 2015 […]

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Taxes, Charitable Gifts, the ACA, and Ineffective Deadlines

By :: December 30th, 2014

Scrambling to make a last-minute charitable donation to beat the New Year’s Eve deadline for a 2014 tax deduction? Take a deep breath and ask yourself, “Why am I going through this craziness now?” Why is an activity that is largely (though not entirely) tax-motivated built around the end of the calendar year rather than […]

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House GOP Leadership Would Require Dynamic Scoring of Some Tax Bills. Will It Matter?

By :: December 24th, 2014

Last night, the House Republican leadership proposed new rules that would require the Joint Committee on Taxation and the Congressional Budget Office to incorporate macroeconomic effects of “major” legislation into their official budget estimates. But there may be less to these new rules for so-called “dynamic scoring” than meets the eye. The GOP did not […]

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