Howard Gleckman

BIO
Howard Gleckman is a Resident Fellow at the Urban Institute and editor of TaxVox. He is author of “Caring for Our Parents,” (St. Martin’s Press), a book on how we deliver and finance long-term care to seniors and adults with disabilities. He was formerly senior correspondent in the Washington bureau of Business Week, a Media Fellow at the Kaiser Family Foundation, and a Visiting Fellow at the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College. Twitter: @howard_gleckman


Marco Rubio Wasn't the Only One Who Cashed Out an IRA Last Year

By :: May 26th, 2015

It is easy to mock Senator Marco Rubio, who cashed out $68,241 in IRA retirement funds last September. The GOP presidential hopeful, who made about $230,000 last year, told Fox News he needed the dough to prepare for his campaign, buy a new $3,000 refrigerator, and fix his busted a/c. As it happens, he is far […]

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Are GOP Presidential Candidates Downplaying Tax Cuts Or Hiding The Ball?

By :: May 19th, 2015

Last week, I blogged on the many GOP presidential candidates who are talking about tax reform rather than tax cuts. This week, tax historian Joe Thorndike published a rebuttal on the Tax Analysts blog and on Forbes.com. Joe, who is very much in the watch-what-they-do-not what-they-say (WWTDNWTS) camp, noted that while few GOP presidential hopefuls […]

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A Divided Supreme Court Rejects Maryland’s Tax On Out-Of-State Income

By :: May 18th, 2015

In a 5-4 decision, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled today that a Maryland law is unconstitutional because it allows residents only a partial tax credit for out-of-state income that is taxed in other states.  The decision not only invalidates the Maryland law but may also limit similar taxes in New York, Pennsylvania, Indiana, and Ohio. […]

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The Scary New World of Tax Fraud

By :: May 14th, 2015

Back in the day—say 2011–tax fraud was pretty straightforward. Taxpayers deliberately understated income or overstated deductions to cheat the system for their own benefit. Not anymore. Now, a growing share of such fraud is about crooks using the identities of innocent taxpayers to steal money. If you have a home phone or an email account, these […]

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Is the GOP’s Enthusiasm for Tax Cuts Going the Way of American Idol?

By :: May 12th, 2015

The silence is deafening.  Remarkably, Republicans lining up to run for president aren’t talking about cutting taxes. Tax reform? Sure. Rate cuts? Absolutely. But so far at least, national Republicans seem more willing to tackle same-sex marriage than big Ronald Reagan/George W. Bush-style tax cuts. The latest examples are New Jersey Governor Chris Christie and former neurosurgeon and […]

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Congress Has Not Passed A 2016 Budget. It Has Only Begun The Process.

By :: May 7th, 2015

Headline in this morning’s Washington Post:  “In a Slog Forward, Congress Passes Budget.” I’ll leave it to others to parse what a slog forward is, but rest assured Congress has not passed a budget. Congressional Republicans, with no support from Democrats, have approved a budget resolution. But that document is merely a non-binding fiscal framework, […]

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Can States Boost Growth By Cutting Top Individual Tax Rates?

By :: May 4th, 2015

States can generate powerful economic growth by cutting income tax rates. That, at least, is the theory behind a recent wave of tax cuts, or proposed tax cuts, around the country. Kansas has cut taxes repeatedly in recent years. So has Wisconsin. In Maine, Governor Paul LePage vows to repeal his state’s income tax entirely.  […]

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ACA Tax Filing Was Surprisingly Painless, But Not For All

By :: April 29th, 2015

It turns out that the first year of tax filing for people who have Affordable Care Act health insurance subsidies was a lot easier than the first year of enrolling in the online exchanges. In contrast to the ACA’s maiden open enrollment season, the initial process of settling up incorrect subsidies was a relative breeze. […]

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A Small But Important Change in Retirement Savings Rules

By :: April 27th, 2015

Earlier this year, the Obama Administration proposed a small and almost unnoticed change in retirement savings rules that could be a big help to middle-income seniors who want to preserve assets to pay for medical and long-term care costs in very old age. The proposal would exempt those who have $100,000 or less in retirement […]

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Could a Carbon Tax Finance Corporate Rate Cuts?

By :: April 23rd, 2015

How about using revenue from a carbon tax to help pay for corporate tax rate cuts? That’s the idea proposed yesterday by Rep. John Delaney (D-MD). His political calculation: Democrats would back the bill as a way to reduce carbon emissions and slow climate change. Republicans would support the plan to cut corporate tax rates […]

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