Howard Gleckman

Howard Gleckman is a Resident Fellow at the Urban Institute and editor of TaxVox. He is author of “Caring for Our Parents,” (St. Martin’s Press), a book on how we deliver and finance long-term care to seniors and adults with disabilities. He was formerly senior correspondent in the Washington bureau of Business Week, a Media Fellow at the Kaiser Family Foundation, and a Visiting Fellow at the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College. Twitter: @howard_gleckman

How Investment Managers (And Maybe You) Would Benefit From Trump’s Tax Plan

By :: October 1st, 2015

Donald Trump says he’d eliminate the tax break on carried interest. What he doesn’t say is he’d give the investment managers who now benefit from that scheme an even bigger tax cut than they get today. And, it turns out, Trump’s new tax regime would not only benefit hedge fund managers, but also millions of […]

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Trump Proposes a Huge Tax Cut

By :: September 28th, 2015

Donald Trump, who likes superlatives, has weighed in with his version of a standard cut-the-rates, broaden-the-base tax reform. And like many other GOP tax rewrite proposals, this one appears to be an enormous tax cut skewed largely in favor of high-income households. While Trump claims the plan would pay for itself after three years, he […]

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Senate Democrats Would Take Some Small Steps To Clean Up Energy Tax Breaks

By :: September 22nd, 2015

A group of 28 Senate Democrats has proposed a major new energy bill that includes what they call significant reforms in the dozens of tax breaks aimed at encouraging the production and use of clean energy. I’ll let real energy policy experts speak to the broader bill, but the tax provisions are worthy of note. […]

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Most State Budgets Are Improving But Their Long-Term Prospects Remain Uncertain

By :: September 17th, 2015

If you are not an energy dependent state, things ought to be pretty good, at least in the short-term. The economy is improving, though slowly, The Rockefeller Institute reported this morning that state tax revenues grew by 5.8 percent in the first quarter of this year and by 7.6 percent in the second quarter. But […]

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The Cost of the Bush Tax Cuts, and What It Might Mean

By :: September 10th, 2015

While GOP presidential hopeful Jeb Bush has been reluctant to describe his tax plan as a tax cut, economists close to him have not. And newly-released cost estimates of his tax reform plan– and their consequences–are worth considering.  The very short version: His plan would add at least a trillion dollars to the national debt […]

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Jeb Bush’s Tax Plan: High Marks for Transparency But Key Questions Remain

By :: September 9th, 2015

At first glance, GOP presidential hopeful Jeb Bush’s tax reform plan is a standard lower-the-rates, broaden-the-base overhaul of the revenue code. But a closer look shows a something-for-everyone stew filled with interesting ingredients—most basic GOP fare but seasoned with a few surprising ideas. Bush, like fellow Floridian Marco Rubio, gets credit for putting out a […]

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Five Tax Stories To Watch in What Will Be a Wild Fall in Congress and on the Campaign Trail

By :: September 8th, 2015

Congress is back. Fiscal deadlines loom. Presidential candidates have tax plans to propose. It isn’t clear how much lawmakers will accomplish in the next four months, but it will be a busy and interesting fall. Here are five stories to watch: International Tax Reform: House Republicans insist they want to try to rewrite the tax […]

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Why Individual Tax Revenues Will Grow Even If Congress Doesn’t Raise Taxes

By :: September 3rd, 2015

The other day, I wrote about new Congressional Budget Office estimates that individual income tax revenues are likely to grow significantly over the next decade. A new paper by my Tax Policy Center colleagues Jim Nunns and Jeff Rohaly shows the importance of this trend through the rest of the century and explains in valuable […]

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Could a Carbon Tax Prevent The Catastrophic Consequences of Climate Change That Obama Fears?

By :: September 1st, 2015

In recent days, President Obama has painted the risks of climate change in apocalyptic terms.  Speaking in Anchorage, AK on Monday, Obama warned that without quick action to slow or reverse global warming, “entire nations will find themselves under severe, severe problems: More drought. More floods. Rising sea levels. Greater migration. More refugees. More scarcity. […]

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CBO Sees a Big Increase in Individual Income Tax Revenues Over the Next Decade

By :: August 27th, 2015

In its semi-annual fiscal update released this week, the Congressional Budget Office projects that federal revenues will remain flat over the next decade, while spending—mostly for health care and Social Security—will rise. The result: Budget deficits, which have been declining in recent years as the economy has grown, will once again start to rise. But […]

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