Howard Gleckman

BIO
Howard Gleckman is a Resident Fellow at the Urban Institute and editor of TaxVox. He is author of “Caring for Our Parents,” (St. Martin’s Press), a book on how we deliver and finance long-term care to seniors and adults with disabilities. He was formerly senior correspondent in the Washington bureau of Business Week, a Media Fellow at the Kaiser Family Foundation, and a Visiting Fellow at the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College. Twitter: @howard_gleckman


The International Spitting Match Over the Google Tax Intensifies

By :: February 2nd, 2016

Call it the perils of one-off corporate tax settlements. While the developed world is trying—with limited success– to figure out how to tax multinational corporations, individual countries are making their own deals to collect back taxes with those firms. It is not a pretty sight. Last week, the UK reached a $187 million settlement with […]

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Tyco, Tax Inversions, Income Shifting, and Lost Revenue

By :: January 26th, 2016

Yesterday was quite a day for corporate tax geeks. We saw a corporate tax inversion that comes with a long, Baroque history; an estimate by Reed College economist Kim Clausing that inversions and other income-shifting techniques reduced Treasury revenues by as much as $111 billion in 2012; and a new Congressional Budget Office projection that […]

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What Are the Consequences of a Financial Transactions Tax?

By :: January 21st, 2016

All three Democratic presidential hopefuls, Hillary Clinton, Martin O’Malley, and Bernie Sanders, have proposed financial transactions taxes (FTTs). But could such a levy raise much money and reduce financial sector risk, as their supporters hope? Perhaps, according to a report by my Tax Policy Center colleagues. But if not carefully designed, the tax could do […]

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Bernie Sanders Is Proposing Really Big Tax Increases

By :: January 19th, 2016

It is hard to grasp the enormity of the tax increases Bernie Sanders is proposing, how far out-of-step he is with recent economic history in the U.S., and what a stunning contrast he presents with Republican presidential hopefuls. Where Sanders backs tax increases of more than $1 trillion a year aimed mostly at high income […]

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Clinton and Sanders Face Off Over Who Should Pay for New Social Programs

By :: January 13th, 2016

Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders both want to create ambitious new government programs to help middle-income families with medical and education costs and family leave. Both say they’d pay for those initiatives by raising taxes. But there is an important difference between them: Clinton would finance her ideas by boosting taxes only on high-income households […]

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If Banning Negligent Low-Income Households From Taking Tax Credits Is Such a Great Idea, Why Stop With Them?

By :: January 7th, 2016

Congress has banned more low-income families who file erroneous tax returns from receiving refundable credits. If lawmakers think this is such a terrific idea, why stop at low-income households? For instance, why shouldn’t Congress bar trade associations from claiming tax-exempt status if they file improper reports to the IRS? Or prohibit hedge fund managers from enjoying preferential […]

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What Can Congress and President Obama Accomplish in 2016?

By :: January 4th, 2016

Can Congress and President Obama, who have battled over policy for seven years, reach consensus over key tax and other issues in the months leading up to the 2016 election? To ask the question is practically to answer it, but it is worth taking a closer look at the policy dynamics. Start by building a […]

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Trump Would Slash Taxes for the Top 0.1 Percent By An Average of $1.3 Million, Add Nearly $10 Trillion to the Debt

By :: December 22nd, 2015

Donald Trump’s tax plan would add $9.5 trillion to the national debt from 2016 to 2026 and another $15 trillion in the following decade (before added interest), according to a new analysis by the Tax Policy Center. Nearly all households would get a tax cut under the plan, averaging about $5,100 in 2017. However, the […]

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The TaxVox Lump of Coal Awards for the Ten Worst Tax Ideas of 2015

By :: December 21st, 2015

It is time for TaxVox’s annual Lump of Coal awards for the worst tax ideas (or most depressing tax stories) of 2015. As always, choosing the Top 10 was not easy, but here they are: 10. The Michigan House. Lawmakers tried to pay for new transportation projects by eliminating the state’s earned income tax credit. […]

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The Hidden Agenda Behind This Year’s Tax Extender Bill

By :: December 16th, 2015

While Republican presidential hopefuls were debating in Las Vegas, congressional leaders announced they had agreed to restore and extend dozens of special interest tax cuts—many permanently. And those GOP candidates for the White House? They’ve promised to repeal nearly all of the tax breaks congressional leaders worked so hard to restore. What is going on […]

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