Howard Gleckman

BIO
Howard Gleckman is a Resident Fellow at the Urban Institute and editor of TaxVox. He is author of “Caring for Our Parents,” (St. Martin’s Press), a book on how we deliver and finance long-term care to seniors and adults with disabilities. He was formerly senior correspondent in the Washington bureau of Business Week, a Media Fellow at the Kaiser Family Foundation, and a Visiting Fellow at the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College. Twitter: @howard_gleckman


CBO Sees a Big Increase in Individual Income Tax Revenues Over the Next Decade

By :: August 27th, 2015

In its semi-annual fiscal update released this week, the Congressional Budget Office projects that federal revenues will remain flat over the next decade, while spending—mostly for health care and Social Security—will rise. The result: Budget deficits, which have been declining in recent years as the economy has grown, will once again start to rise. But […]

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Should College Endowments Be Taxed?

By :: August 25th, 2015

Last week, the often-provocative Victor Fleischer rocked the higher education world with a New York Times op-ed that accused universities of hoarding their often-enormous endowments instead of spending the funds on student aid. Vic, a tax law professor at the University of San Diego, suggested that colleges be required to spend at least 8 percent […]

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Scott Walker’s Replacement for the ACA Would Leave Many Uninsured

By :: August 20th, 2015

GOP presidential hopeful Scott Walker’s plan to replace the Affordable Care Act is built on a controversial framework of tax subsidies that Walker estimates would cost about $1 trillion over 10 years. The plan is already drawing heat from fellow GOP candidate Bobby Jindal, who called it “a new entitlement program” that he says would […]

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New Rules Will Require States to Be More Transparent About Tax Subsidies

By :: August 18th, 2015

Congrats to the Government Accounting Standards Board for pushing state and local governments to be more transparent about their tax subsidies. Last week, the agency approved new disclosure requirements that will require states and localities to publicly disclose how much of a given tax is being abated, what other commitments they make as part of […]

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Why Did Scott Walker Commit $400 Million for a Pro Basketball Arena?

By :: August 13th, 2015

Yesterday, Wisconsin Governor—and GOP presidential hopeful–Scott Walker committed more than $400 million in taxpayer money to help build a new basketball arena for a group of wealthy investors. Walker, like many pols before him, fell for the promise of huge economic returns from a state-of-the art sports arena (in this case, a gym for the […]

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Clinton Would Tinker With, Not Rewrite, the Tax Code

By :: August 11th, 2015

While many Republican presidential candidates are promoting their versions of broad-based tax reform, Democratic frontrunner Hillary Clinton so far seems disinterested in fundamentally restructuring the code. Instead, she’d retain the framework of the current tax law, while tweaking the code to encourage–or discourage–certain activities. In the past few weeks, in different ways, she’s begun to describe […]

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How Did the Gas Tax Lose Its Mojo, Even Among Conservatives?

By :: July 27th, 2015

With just a few days left before federal funding for highway programs expires, the Senate is debating all sorts of amendments to an extension– from export subsidies to the Affordable Care Act. But there is one subject it will not debate—the gas tax. Except for a handful of lawmakers, nobody in Congress or the White House […]

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Who Benefits Most From Repealing the ACA Cadillac Tax?

By :: July 23rd, 2015

Republicans and some Democrats in Congress are pressing to repeal the Affordable Care Act’s Cadillac tax—a 40 percent excise tax on high-cost employer-sponsored health insurance plans. Backers of repeal argue that curbs on these generous plans would disproportionately hurt low- and middle-income workers. But a new Tax Policy Center analysis shows that story is overstated. In […]

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Hillary Clinton’s Complex, Gimmicky Profit-Sharing Plan

By :: July 21st, 2015

Democratic presidential frontrunner Hillary Clinton has offered a new tax subsidy to encourage firms to share profits with their employees. The idea of profit sharing is worth debating, but Clinton’s specific proposal is enormously complicated and depends on budget gimmicks to add up. Her basic idea: Give firms a 15 percent tax credit for each […]

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Should The IRS Become a Consumer Agency Instead of a Tax Cop?

By :: July 16th, 2015

In her latest report to Congress, IRS Taxpayer Advocate Nina Olson made the provocative suggestion that her agency completely rethink its mission: “It should transform itself as a tax agency from one that is designed around nabbing the small percentage of the population that actively evades tax to one that aims first and foremost to […]

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