Tag: ‘treasury’

Why Do Taxpayers Leave Money on the Table?

By :: May 6th, 2015

My dad taught a teenage me an important lesson when he helped me file my first federal income tax return. I earned the minimum wage at a part-time job, and didn’t have to file. But he explained that I should file, knowing my effort would be rewarded. “You don’t earn enough to owe income taxes,” […]

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Just the Facts, Ma’am: On Filing and Reform

By :: March 30th, 2015

Congress is in recess and the Daily Deduction will post Mondays until it reconvenes. We’ll be back to our regular schedule on April 13.  With just over two weeks till Tax Day, Treasury wants to clarify Affordable Care Act tax facts. It released fact sheets on common exemptions from the individual mandate, such as a […]

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Will Tax Reform See Light at the End of the Next Tunnel?

By :: September 19th, 2014

Jack Lew on corporate inversions: “Action is going to be taken.” Treasury Secretary Jack Lew says that ”any company considering an inversion is now on notice that there is action that is going to be taken.” Administrative curbs would limit the economic benefits of inversions but only congressional action could solve the inversion problem entirely, […]

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Tax Policy in September: Racing to a Grinding Halt?

By :: September 12th, 2014

Have it your way… unless you’re Burger King. Five Senate Democrats—Illinois’ Dick Durbin, Michigan’s Carl Levin, Rhode Island’s Jack Reed, Vermont’s Bernie Sanders and Ohio’s Sherrod Brown—asked Burger King to not move its legal headquarters to lower-tax Canada. They accused it of trying to avoid paying its fair share for roads and other public services […]

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The Amazing [Anti-Inversion] Race

By :: September 10th, 2014

There’s tougher talk from Treasury. Secretary Jack Lew affirmed administrative authority to curb inversions, telling Bloomberg that “If Congress doesn’t act, we have to take the steps we can, which will reduce the economic value of inversions.” There’s more talk on the Hill, too. Senate Finance Committee Chair Ron Wyden wants to “continue to work […]

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Inversions, Loopholes, Taxes and TIFs: What’s a Revenue Service to Do?

By :: September 9th, 2014

Inversions: The waiting is the hardest part. At yesterday’s TPC event Treasury Secretary Jack Lew promised an anti-inversion decision “soon,” but committed to no other details. While everybody agrees corporate inversions are done largely to avoid taxes, does Treasury have the authority to prevent them? If so, should it? New York University’s Sally Katzen, Harvard’s […]

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Business Tax Reform: Will Patience Be a Vice?

By :: September 8th, 2014

Treasury speaks on business tax reform at TPC. Tune in this morning. Treasury Secretary Jack Lew will address business tax reform and will be followed by a panel discussion on corporate inversions, a US tax avoidance strategy. The panel includes Sally Katzen of the NYU School of Law, TPC’s Steven Rosenthal, John Samuels of General […]

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Why the Next Debt Limit Debacle Might be Worse

By :: December 3rd, 2013

Congress’s latest flirtation with debt-limit default caused barely a ripple in the financial markets. Rates on short-term Treasuries spiked in early October, before quickly subsiding to more normal levels. The spread between one- and three-year Treasuries temporarily widened, but quickly fell back to a more normal trend. All told, financial markets barely blinked. Unfortunately, the […]

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The Fed and America’s Debt

By :: July 15th, 2013

Is the Federal Reserve part of the government? You might think so, but you wouldn’t know it from the way we talk about America’s debt. When it comes to the debt held by the public, for example, the Fed is just a member of the public. That accounting reflects the Fed’s unusual independence from the […]

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Uncle Sam’s Trillion-Dollar Portfolio Partly Offsets the Public Debt

By :: June 24th, 2013

When policy folks talk about America’s federal borrowing, their go-to measures are the public debt, currently $12 trillion, and its ratio to gross domestic product, which is approaching 75 percent. Those figures represent the debt that Treasury has sold into public capital markets, pays interest on, and will one day roll over or repay. These […]

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