Tag: ‘taxes’

Where Are Tax Rates Headed?

By :: December 12th, 2013

Effective tax rates have been rising since 2009 and will continue to rise for a few more years before they flatten out, according to Tax Policy Center projections. My TaxVox post earlier this week showed how average federal tax rates have changed over the past three decades. But that was based on a 30-year history […]

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Budget Deal Doesn’t Raise Taxes But Many Will Still Pay More

By :: December 11th, 2013

The budget deal announced Tuesday wouldn’t raise taxes—members of Congress can vote for it without violating their no-tax pledges. But the plan will collect billions of dollars in new revenue by boosting fees and increasing workers’ contributions to the Federal Employee Retirement System (FERS). To people paying them, those higher fees and payments will feel […]

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CBO Finds Growing U.S. Income Inequality

By :: December 9th, 2013

Just as President Obama was decrying our nation’s rising income inequality, the Congressional Budget Office provided him with some new ammunition. CBO’s latest report on household income and taxes—which goes only through 2010—shows that the rich have indeed gotten richer. (Full disclosure: In my former life at CBO, I helped assemble these income and tax […]

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Latest House Debt Limit Plan Will Accomplish Nothing

By :: October 10th, 2013

Washington may be about to do what it does best–kick the can down the road. House Republicans have tentatively agreed on a plan to extend the debt limit for about six weeks while keeping the government partially shuttered. Their idea: use the shutdown as a stick to get Democrats to negotiate over “pressing problems,” including more […]

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Could the GOP Boost Tax Reform By Adding the Idea to the Debt Limit?

By :: September 26th, 2013

House Republicans reportedly are considering several ways to add a framework for tax reform to legislation needed to increase the federal government’s borrowing authority. Could such a rider increase the chances of reform happening in the near future? Sadly, no. Indeed, it is likely to bury a tax code rewrite even more deeply in Washington’s […]

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How Washington Will Use the Coming Budget Wars To Duck Hard Choices

By :: August 27th, 2013

Treasury Secretary Jack Lew has notified Congress that the U.S. government will reach the limits of its ability to borrow in mid-October.  Lew’s letter sounds the opening notes of the overture to this fall’s fiscal grand opera. Between October 1 and the end of the calendar year, President Obama and Congress will battle over the […]

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Uncle Sam Is Smaller (Relatively) Than We Thought

By :: July 31st, 2013

At 8:30 this morning, Uncle Sam suddenly shrunk. Federal spending fell from 21.5 percent of gross domestic product to 20.8 percent, while taxes declined from 17.5 percent to 16.9 percent. To be clear, the government is spending and collecting just as much as it did yesterday. But we now know that the U.S. economy is […]

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Why the Tax Cuts in the Senate Budget Don’t Add up

By :: March 21st, 2013

The Senate Democrats’ budget, like the House version, rips unfair and inefficient tax preferences that litter the revenue code. But the tax provisions of the Senate budget, which is being debated on the floor today, raise at least two big problems: They see flaws in only in those tax expenditures that benefit high-income households and big […]

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A Carbon Tax is a Win-Win for the Economy and the Environment

By :: March 12th, 2013

Looking for a way to improve the operation of the economy, lower our dependence on foreign oil, reduce pollution, slow global warming, cut government spending, and decrease the long-term budget deficit? Then you should support a carbon tax, which could help the nation address all these issues simultaneously. A new paper I’ve written with Samuel […]

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Build America Bonds, the Medicaid Expansion, and Trust Between the States and the Feds

By :: March 7th, 2013

States trying to decide whether to expand their Medicaid programs to cover more low-income uninsured might want to take a look at the fate of a more obscure federal program—cash subsidies to state and local governments that sell certain kinds of bonds, especially Build America  Bonds. If they do, they’ll see what happens to a […]

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