Posts Tagged ‘taxes’

A Carbon Tax is a Win-Win for the Economy and the Environment

Looking for a way to improve the operation of the economy, lower our dependence on foreign oil, reduce pollution, slow global warming, cut government spending, and decrease the long-term budget deficit? Then you should support a carbon tax, which could help the nation address all these issues simultaneously. A new paper I’ve written with Samuel […]

Build America Bonds, the Medicaid Expansion, and Trust Between the States and the Feds

States trying to decide whether to expand their Medicaid programs to cover more low-income uninsured might want to take a look at the fate of a more obscure federal program—cash subsidies to state and local governments that sell certain kinds of bonds, especially Build America  Bonds. If they do, they’ll see what happens to a […]

The Sequester is Not Too Big, It is Too Stupid

The latest chapter in Washington’s never-ending fiscal drama is about to play out in tomorrow’s sequester–a word most Americans should never have had to learn. For all the partisan noise about these automatic spending cuts, it is important to keep in mind that they are both relatively small and very stupid. First, the size. As the […]

How Obama’s Inaugural Address Frames the Policy Debate for the Next Decade

 “We must make the hard choices to reduce the cost of health care and the size of our deficit.  But we reject the belief that America must choose between caring for the generation that built this country and investing in the generation that will build its future.” With those words in his 2nd inaugural address, […]

2013 May Be the Year of Perpetual Fiscal Crisis

If 2012 was the year of modest economic recovery and surprising Democratic election success, 2013 may be the year of perpetual fiscal policy crisis. After watching the still-unresolved partisan battle over the fiscal cliff, it is increasingly hard to imagine Congress and President Obama reaching anything like a big budget deal next year. Instead, it […]

Give Now or Pay Later: The Ever-Changing Estate and Gift Tax

For over a decade, the federal estate and gift tax has been in constant flux with its exemption rising, its rates falling, and its near-death experience in 2010 followed by resurrection in a reduced state. Now Congress once again has to decide what to do about these levies, which affect relatively few taxpayers but get an […]

Understanding TPC’s Analysis of Limiting Deductions

The Tax Policy Center’s new tables showing the revenue and distributional effects of capping itemized deductions have received a great deal of attention since we released them on Tuesday. Our results show that capping deductions can raise a large amount of revenue in a quite progressive manner. Capping deductions could thus be an important component […]

How Much Revenue Would a Cap on Itemized Deductions Raise?

In last night’s debate, Mitt Romney repeated the idea that he could pay for much or all of the 20 percent rate reduction and other tax cuts in his tax plan by capping itemized deductions at $25,000. He had previously suggested a $17,000 cap in an interview and, in the first debate, $25,000 or $50,000 […]

What the Joint Tax Committee Really Said About Tax Reform

On Friday, congressional Democrats released the results of a new analysis of base-broadening, rate-cutting tax reform by the Joint Committee on Taxation. For reformers everywhere the results seemed exceedingly grim: By eliminating all deductions, Congress could reduce tax rates by only a puny 4 percent without adding to the deficit. The top tax rate, for instance, […]

Fiscal Cliff, the Video

The fiscal cliff is big (more than $500 billion in scheduled tax increases in 2013) and complicated (involving literally dozens of tax provisions, not just the long-debated 2001-2003 tax cuts). If you haven’t found time to read our full report on the fiscal cliff — or even if you have — you might enjoy this short video highlighting our main […]