Tag: ‘tax revenues’

Obama’s New Corporate Tax Offer is Another Dead End

By :: July 30th, 2013

In a speech today in Chattanooga TN, President Obama made congressional Republicans an offer they could refuse. And they did.  By doing so, Obama may have quashed the last shred of hope that tax reform can happen before the 2014 congressional elections. In what the White House pitched as a new idea, Obama offered to […]

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Smart Tax Reform Could Shrink the Government

By :: July 8th, 2013

Max Baucus and Dave Camp, leaders of the Senate and House tax-writing committees, are on the road promoting tax simplification. One goal: cleaning out the mess of deductions, exclusions, credits, and other tax breaks that complicate the code. Done well, such house cleaning could make for a simpler, fairer, more pro-growth tax code. It could […]

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High Income Households Would Pay Most—But Not All—of the New Taxes in Obama’s 2014 Budget

By :: April 22nd, 2013

The revenue proposals included in President Obama’s 2014 budget would, as intended, significantly raise taxes on the highest-income American households. However, despite Obama’s long-standing pledge to protect individuals making below $200,000 (and couples making $250,000 or less) from any tax hikes, even many of those families would pay slightly more than under today’s tax law. […]

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The Real 2014 Budget Battle May Be Over Spending, Not Taxes

By :: April 10th, 2013

President Obama’s 2014 budget arrived two months late and was declared DOA by the House GOP leadership days before they even saw it. Yet, it is full of items of interest, including a new millionaire tax and a renewed proposal to limit the value of tax preferences for high income households. But what about the […]

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What the Tax Policy Center Really Said About the Ryan Budget

By :: March 19th, 2013

The political response to the Tax Policy Center’s analysis of House Budget Committee chairman Paul Ryan’s (R-WI) fiscal plan was predictable, and mostly based on caricatures of what TPC actually concluded. To review: TPC found that tax cuts similar to those described in the committee’s plan would add $5.7 trillion to the budget deficit over […]

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“Common Sense” Aside, What Do We Really Know About Capital Income Taxes and Growth?

By :: March 15th, 2013

If you’re discussing tax policy with someone who asserts that his or her point is “just common sense,” this could indicate one of two things: Either no deep thought is required—as the person would have you believe. Or no deep thought has been applied. The “common sense” notion that capital income taxes hinder growth seems […]

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House GOP Would Need $5.7 Trillion in Tax Hikes to Offset Ryan Rate Cuts

By :: March 15th, 2013

House Budget Committee Chair Paul Ryan’s (R-WI) fiscal plan promises to balance the federal budget in 10 years, make major cuts in income tax rates for both individuals and corporations, and raise the same amount of revenue as current law. If House Republicans want to do all three, they will have to eliminate trillions of […]

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Obama’s State of the Union and the Great Deficit Smackdown

By :: February 12th, 2013

House Republicans say they want to balance the budget in a decade with only spending cuts and no tax hikes. In his state of the union address tonight, President Obama—perhaps channeling his new pal New Jersey Governor Chris Christie—had a response. In a word, fuhgedaboutit. Obama’s priorities: Gun control and immigration reform, along with a […]

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The Risks of Dumbing Down Fiscal Goals

By :: February 1st, 2013

In one of the more dangerous fiscal developments of recent months, some on the left are defining successful deficit reduction as merely stabilizing the federal debt at about 70 percent of Gross Domestic Product by 2022. While there is no magic target, this one is far too modest and threatens to leave future fiscal policy […]

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Five Ways the Chasm Between Democratic and Republican Budget Plans is Growing

By :: January 24th, 2013

If their leaders’ public statements are to be believed, the fiscal chasm between the political parties is widening. And it is hard to see how it can be bridged.    Congressional Democrats and Republicans have agreed to put off the next budget crisis for a month or so. This is a good thing, especially considering […]

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