Tag: ‘tax extenders’

The Debt Limit: Here We Go Again

By :: October 15th, 2015

In less than a month—and in perhaps as little as 18 days– the federal government will be unable to pay its bills. Realistically, there is only one way to avoid such a fiscal mess: Congress must raise the federal debt limit so Treasury can borrow more money. But how will that happen? On one hand, […]

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Senate Democrats Would Take Some Small Steps To Clean Up Energy Tax Breaks

By :: September 22nd, 2015

A group of 28 Senate Democrats has proposed a major new energy bill that includes what they call significant reforms in the dozens of tax breaks aimed at encouraging the production and use of clean energy. I’ll let real energy policy experts speak to the broader bill, but the tax provisions are worthy of note. […]

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Five Tax Stories To Watch in What Will Be a Wild Fall in Congress and on the Campaign Trail

By :: September 8th, 2015

Congress is back. Fiscal deadlines loom. Presidential candidates have tax plans to propose. It isn’t clear how much lawmakers will accomplish in the next four months, but it will be a busy and interesting fall. Here are five stories to watch: International Tax Reform: House Republicans insist they want to try to rewrite the tax […]

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The Perpetual, Immortal, Eternal, Never-Ending Tax Extenders

By :: May 28th, 2015

The magic number for today is 16. That is, remarkably, the number of times Congress has extended the allegedly temporary research and experimentation tax credit since it was first enacted in 1981.  The question for philosophy class (this is far beyond economics) is this: Can something that has been extended 16 times over 33 years […]

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Trying to Square the House’s Tax Cuts and Its No-Tax-Cut Budget

By :: March 19th, 2015

DOA budgets are hardly new. But House tax writers seem to be ignoring their own party’s fiscal plan. The House Budget Committee’s fiscal framework would not change expected revenues over the next 10 years.  While it recommends enormous (though unspecified) spending cuts in an attempt to eliminate the deficit over the next decade, tax revenues […]

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Lawmakers Talk Tax Reform But Keep Pushing New Tax Subsidies

By :: February 12th, 2015

It is hard not to notice that while policymakers are talking tax reform they are walking tax deform. The more they vow to lower tax rates and eliminate targeted tax preferences (close loopholes in Congress-speak), the more bills they push to create new subsidies or juice up old ones. Yesterday, the Senate Finance Committee created three new tax […]

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How Will Jeb Bush Turn His Vision of Government into Tax Policy?

By :: February 5th, 2015

Jeb Bush gave a fascinating and important speech yesterday to the Detroit Economic Club, a traditional venue for presidential candidates. In it, he laid out an economic and social vision that echoed in many ways the “compassionate conservatism” message that his brother used with great success in his first run for the White House. But the […]

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Spending Caps? What Spending Caps?

By :: January 30th, 2015

Up next week: The President’s Budget. President Obama will release his budget  for fiscal year 2016 on Monday. The plan would increase spending above the sequester limits of  the Budget Control Act of 2011. Steep cuts were triggered in 2013 when Congress failed to reach a budget deal, but were then temporarily suspended thanks to […]

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Nine Tax Stories to Watch in 2015

By :: January 6th, 2015

So much has changed. Yet, when it comes to taxes, so much has not. Republicans have taken control of Congress and now hold governorships in 31 states. The U.S. economy is finally on solid ground. And presidential hopefuls are gearing up for the 2016 election. But for all that, the top tax stories of 2015 […]

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The Tax Vox Lump of Coal Awards: The 10 Worst Tax Ideas of 2014

By :: December 23rd, 2014

It’s time for the annual Tax Vox Lump of Coal Awards for the worst tax policy of 2014. The past 12 months were a banner year for bad ideas and their perpetrators. The Top 10 are: Frank Underwood & Elvis. Tax subsidies for economic development hardly ever pay for themselves. But two are worthy of […]

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