Tag: ‘Eric Toder’

Tax Reform Is Possible, But It Won’t be Easy

By :: November 4th, 2015

At a Tax Policy Center conference on tax reform yesterday, Jason Furman, the chair of the President’s Council of Economic Advisors, said that a major rewrite of the tax code would make little progress until Congress breaks the current impasse over the  treatment of pass-throughs– firms such as partnerships and S corporations whose owners pay […]

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The Case of the Questionable Tax Incentive: Women and Retirement Savings

By :: November 4th, 2015

Twenty years ago, I turned 25 and earned my first raise. My older sister gave me some great advice: “When you get a raise always put some extra money into savings. Make it a habit. You’ll never miss it.” I turned into a saver, thanks to my sister. Yet, the average 45-year-old woman is not […]

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Could a Carbon Tax Prevent The Catastrophic Consequences of Climate Change That Obama Fears?

By :: September 1st, 2015

In recent days, President Obama has painted the risks of climate change in apocalyptic terms.  Speaking in Anchorage, AK on Monday, Obama warned that without quick action to slow or reverse global warming, “entire nations will find themselves under severe, severe problems: More drought. More floods. Rising sea levels. Greater migration. More refugees. More scarcity. […]

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What’s Up With the No Climate Tax Pledge?

By :: June 2nd, 2015

Do you know about the No Climate Tax pledge? I didn’t until I read a column over the weekend by the Washington Post’s always-interesting Catherine Rampell. The vow is sponsored by Americans for Prosperity, a conservative political advocacy group closely associated with the Koch brothers. And it was something of a big deal a couple […]

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The Perpetual, Immortal, Eternal, Never-Ending Tax Extenders

By :: May 28th, 2015

The magic number for today is 16. That is, remarkably, the number of times Congress has extended the allegedly temporary research and experimentation tax credit since it was first enacted in 1981.  The question for philosophy class (this is far beyond economics) is this: Can something that has been extended 16 times over 33 years […]

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Could a Carbon Tax Finance Corporate Rate Cuts?

By :: April 23rd, 2015

How about using revenue from a carbon tax to help pay for corporate tax rate cuts? That’s the idea proposed yesterday by Rep. John Delaney (D-MD). His political calculation: Democrats would back the bill as a way to reduce carbon emissions and slow climate change. Republicans would support the plan to cut corporate tax rates […]

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What Will Happen To Voluntary Tax Compliance If a Budget-constrained IRS Is Not Fixed?

By :: April 9th, 2015

Is the IRS such a mess that the nation’s system of voluntary tax compliance is at risk? Will frustrated taxpayers rebel because they can’t get help with a revenue code they can’t understand? Will aggressive taxpayers who recognize that audit rates have plummeted to the lowest levels in years further push the tax-avoidance envelope?  And […]

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A Look at the Territorial Tax Systems in Four Countries Finds No Magic Bullets

By :: January 22nd, 2015

It is an article of faith among many tax reformers that the U.S. should shift from a worldwide tax system to a territorial regime in which U.S.-based multinational corporations pay U.S. tax only on their domestic income.  Such a step would reduce or eliminate tax on the dividends these firms receive from their foreign affiliates. […]

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Reforming Corporate Taxation

By :: November 24th, 2014

The Cato Institute has organized an online forum to debate pro-growth economic policy reforms. Tax Policy Center scholars Bill Gale, Donald Marron, and Eric Toder have each contributed to the discussion. The U.S. corporate tax system is broken. The current method of taxing the profits of large, publicly traded corporations was designed for an economy […]

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Business Tax Reform: Will Patience Be a Vice?

By :: September 8th, 2014

Treasury speaks on business tax reform at TPC. Tune in this morning. Treasury Secretary Jack Lew will address business tax reform and will be followed by a panel discussion on corporate inversions, a US tax avoidance strategy. The panel includes Sally Katzen of the NYU School of Law, TPC’s Steven Rosenthal, John Samuels of General […]

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